Planet Tracker’s François Mosnier explores the potential of traceability to improve seafood sustainability and profitability in New Food Magazine

Today, about 75 percent of seafood sold is not certified or rated as ‘sustainable’. However, the number of retailers and consumers who are concerned about the sustainability of their fish is increasing – at a pace faster than the supply of sustainably labelled stocks are available to them.

Traceability, the ability to systematically identify seafood products, track their location and reveal any treatments or transformations they undergo, could be the key to resolving this imbalance. Industry-wide implementation of traceability would not only help to verify sustainability claims, but also to increase overall profitability within the seafood sector, explores François Mosnier, Financial Research Analyst at Planet Tracker.

In light of this, Planet Tracker urges investors in the seafood industry – and particularly in seafood processing companies, positioned as a key source of traceability along the seafood supply chain – to engage with the companies in question on this issue.

Read the full article here.

S&P Global Ratings’ Noemie de la Gorce talks to Investments & Pensions Europe on the rise of new sustainable investment vehicles

Sustainability is increasingly becoming a priority, for investors and companies alike. With the rise in financing options available on the capital markets to fund environmental, social, and governance (ESG)-supportive growth, corporates around the world have access to a broader toolbox than ever before to align with Sustainable Development Goals.

Speaking to Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE), Noemie de la Gorce, associate director, sustainable finance at S&P Global Ratings says that new instruments – such as sustainability-linked bonds – can help investors “diversify their contribution to sustainability objectives.”

While tied to different incentive mechanisms, some investors may see these instruments as having the potential to be stronger drivers of change than green bonds – since vehicles like sustainability-linked bonds can give companies financial incentives to advance their sustainability agenda, by linking the cost of funding to specific sustainability objectives.

“Some investors see sustainability-linked bonds as more powerful than green bonds in embedding sustainability into a company’s strategy, because the environmental and social objectives apply to the whole company, instead of a specific transaction,” says de la Gorce.

To read the full article, please click here.

Natixis’ Eric Arnould and Anne-Christine Champion discuss the growing interest in renewables financing in Global Capital interview

Investors are increasingly interested in renewables financing and the growth of so-called “green unicorns”, explain Natixis’ Global Head of Equity Capital Markets, Eric Arnould and Global Head of Real Assets, Anne-Christine Champion.

Speaking to Global Capital at the Natixis Renewable Energy Forum, Champion indicated that activity has substantially picked up over the last year,  with a growing appetite for green, renewable projects and sustainable assets.

Arnould also noted the potential to develop a European hub for renewable energy financing. “The US is likely going to be the centre for high tech listings for some time, but I think Europe can take the lead in renewable energy,” he added.

To read the article in full, please click here (paywall).

Los Pelambres’ proposed US$875m green loan scores E2/68 under S&P Green Evaluation

S&P Global Ratings has awarded a Green Evaluation score of E2/68 to Minera Los Pelambres’ proposed US$875 million loan – the second highest score available on the Green Evaluation scale of E1-E4 – making Los Pelambres the first mining company globally to receive a Green Evaluation. The loan facility will fund part of the company’s US$1.3 billion copper mine expansion project, based in Chile.

Roughly US$530 million of the US$875 million loan is labelled as a green financing since proceeds will be deployed at the new water desalination plant and the associated pipeline. The plant will bring seawater to the plant in Choapa Valley, instead of competing for fresh water in neighboring municipalities, where water resources are scarce and expensive.

Following outreach from Moorgate, TXF News covered the Green Evaluation.

Natixis wins The Banker’s “Most innovative investment bank for climate change and sustainability”

The Banker has named Natixis “Most innovative investment bank for climate change and sustainability” at its 2018 Investment Banking Awards.

The award recognises the innovative work Natixis is doing in the green and sustainable finance sector, including numerous first-of-their-kind deals and the development of an internal mechanism for integrating environmental risks into their overall risk assessment for financings worldwide.

To read the full article, please click here (login required)

Miroslav Petkov, S&P Global Ratings, considers the growth of adaptation finance in the face of climate change, for the Cambridge Institute of Sustainable Leadership (CISL)

Following extreme weather events last year, the international community has issued multiple calls to strengthen infrastructure against extreme weather events and the expected impact of climate change. Writing for the Cambridge Institute of Sustainable Leadership (CISL), Miroslav Petkov, Director, S&P Global Ratings explores the need for and potential rise of adaptation infrastructure finance.

Read the full article here

S&P Global Ratings’ Andrea Croner is quoted in Environmental Finance on the strength of the Nordic green finance market

In Environmental Finance’s article on the Nordic green finance market, Andrea Croner, Associate, S&P Global Ratings, says “The Nordic countries are leading the way for transparency of impact reporting” and “Nordic public sector entities have become sought-after specialists in this area. Partly thanks to their efforts, investing in green bonds has become more transparent and, therefore, more attractive to investors worldwide.”

 

To read the full article, please click here; the article was also published in print. (please note that the online article is behind a paywall)

Credit risk, stranded assets and the environment: S&P Global Ratings’ Mike Wilkins contributes a chapter to a major new Routledge study

With ongoing advances in sustainability, the risk of being unable to monetise ca​r​bon assets grows by the day. A new book from Routledge, Stranded Assets and the Environment: Risk, Resilience and Opportunity, explores the ramifications of asset stranding across various sectors of the global economy.

Mike Wilkins, Head of Sustainable Finance at S&P Global Ratings, supplies chapter 8, drawing on research and real-world corporate case studies to focus on the credit implications of stranded assets.