CTMfile Case study: MultiSafepay goes live with Deutsche Bank’s “Request to Pay” solution

The implementation of Europe’s second Payment Services Directive (PSD2) has unlocked a number of new open banking solutions, such as Request to Pay (RtP). This new solution combines SEPA payments (both classic and instant) with PSD2’s provision for licensed third parties to access and service accounts held by other banks to allow payment service providers (PSPs) and merchants to receive payments on behalf of their customers in a lean and efficient manner.

With markets now adjusting to the changes, these solutions are quickly being put into practice. MultiSafepay, an online payments specialist and one of the pioneers of e-commerce in the Netherlands, is one of the first to take the initiative, participating in a pilot scheme for Deutsche Bank’s innovative open-banking RtP solution, which is now being rolled out to a series of merchants in Germany, with plans to enable it across Europe and beyond.

Read the full case study here.

 

BNY Mellon’s Sindhu Vadakath discusses the arrival of open banking in International Banker

In a commentary article for International Banker, Sindhu Vadakath, Senior Product Manager, Global Payment Services and Asia Payments, Treasury Services, BNY Mellon, takes a look at the introduction of the Second Payment Services Directive (PSD2) and the impact it will have on the core of traditional banking.

PSD2 requires banks to share their closely guarded customer data, opening the gates for the first time to third-party payment providers (TPPs), thus disrupting banks’ long-held monopoly on the payments sector. With an aim to improve transparency, customer rights and service, as well as the costs linked to the end-to-end payments process, the legislation allows TPPs to harness customer data to create cutting-edge products that can viably compete with bank offerings.

But this data-sharing, of course, is not without its risks – especially as TPPs cannot claim the same historical reputation for security and familiarity as their bank counterparts. As such, collaboration between these industry players is key to ensure a smooth roll-out of an efficient and secure payments service for customers in the new era of open banking.

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BNY Mellon discusses the revolution in payments seen across the last 20 years in GTNews

As part of a series of articles celebrating the 20th anniversary of GTNews, Daniel Verbruggen, Michael Bellacosa, Fred DiCocco and Matt Wells from BNY Mellon Treasury Services, come together to discuss the pivotal developments in the payments industry across the last two decades.

Increased regulation resulting from events such as 9/11 and the 2008 global financial crisis have seen a shift in banks’ focus to meeting not only business objectives, but also governmental objectives. Regulations, together with increased client demands and technological advancements, have spurred banks to enhance their offerings to provide greater transparency and convenience – in keeping with the digital expectations of a modernising world.

More recently, the adoption of real-time payment systems, along with electronic banking applications and cryptocurrencies have particularly shaken the foundations of the traditional banking space, and have thrown the gates wide open to non-bank market entrants. With open banking legislation coming into effect at the beginning of 2018, the payments landscape is only set to become increasingly fast-paced and competitive, as banks strive to remain relevant and continue to meet the evolving needs of their clients.

To read the full article, please click here.

BNY Mellon’s Carl Slabicki examines the questions surrounding open banking in Global Banking & Finance Review

Writing for Global Finance & Banking Review, BNY Mellon’s Carl Slabicki, Director, Immediate Payments, Treasury Services, takes a candid look at the arrival of open banking, and what it could mean for the banking industry.

As part of PSD2, financial institutions are now required to share client data with third party payment providers such as fintechs – thus breaking the historical monopoly that banks have held over this client data, and potentially altering the core banking experience as we know it. This data is a valuable business asset, says Slabicki, as it can pave the way for new services from non-bank providers such as loan and mortgage comparison platforms and financial advisory portals.

Although these innovations could enhance the client experience and stimulate healthy competition, the now-accessible data certainly faces significantly heightened security risk. As such, it is vital that the regulatory environment is fluid – able to adapt to requirements accordingly – and that banks focus on supporting these efforts to ensure a smooth transition into the era of open banking.

To read the full article, please click here.